Archive - March 2016

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Following DNA-generated Leads

Following DNA-generated Leads

The wonder of DNA testing is clearly exciting with all it can tell us about ourselves, but as with everything pertaining to genealogy, a little bit of knowledge always seems to lead to a thirst for more information. And while DNA can give us hints about who we could be related to, it is frustratingly non-specific when it comes to figuring out exactly how we connect to our cousins. That’s where paper genealogy comes in.

Right now I’m working with a person who matches my DNA closer than anyone else I’ve encountered through the various tools available (who isn’t a member of my immediate family). In fact, we are each other’s closest matches on GEDmatch.com. The only catch is that neither of us recognizes any known relatives of the other! So we are digging deeper.

GEDmatch ToolsAs I mentioned in a previous post, there are several tools at GEDmatch.com for helping to locate matches to your DNA. One of these tools, called “People who match 2 or more kits”, helps narrow the field somewhat by returning a list of just those kits that match both me and my cousin, with information about how close they estimate the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is for each match. From that list, I picked the top four matches, and since I have been doing genealogy research for longer, I went through my files to see if I could find any of these close matches in previous correspondence. There was one name I think I recognize, so that gave me an idea of which family we might share. But we need to follow up by contacting each of these people and try to find the commonalities in our family trees if we can. This is where the paper, or traditional, genealogy comes in.

By narrowing down the possible matches to one or two families, it is much easier to see if we share relatives with all those whose kits showed a match to both of ours. In this case, my (potential) cousin has turned up someone’s info on AncestryDNA, where she was tested, whose family tree happens to have a lot of names that match my maiden name. This is exciting, since my GGG grandfather, Charles M. Watson (1838-1889), is one of our brick walls. He just appeared in Alabama in the 1870 & 1880 census, saying he was a carpenter from Georgia, then he died and his widow and children went to Texas. We have looked for his birth family for years, with no luck until now, and this connection is still in the “potential” category until we can get more information that can help prove that he is somehow connected to the Watson family that my cousin had found on Ancestry.

Just to complicate matters, though, I have a hunch that we may share so much DNA because we actually are double cousins — that is, we share ancestry in two family lines instead of just one. Remember the person whose email I thought I recognized? She is from a different family from my paternal Watson line. Instead, if she is the person I’m thinking of, we are related through my father’s mother instead of his father. Both families, incidentally, spent at least one generation in Georgia, and my “potential” cousin who is working on this with me knows her family lived in Tennessee, which of course is just the next state over. If this is the case, it could explain how we have so much overlapping DNA in spite of any possible links being at least 4 generations ago.

So, our next step is to try contacting the people identified by GEDmatch. Depending on whether they can confirm belonging to one or the other family in question, we may have something to go on, and then it is just a matter of researching records until we find the MRCA. Stay tuned!

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